Saper vedere: il “giro lungo” dell’antropologia visuale

Paolo Chiozzi

Abstract


Visual anthropology is often identified with ‘Ethnographic film’, thus the debate focuses more on filming than on ethics of anthropological research. In this paper I suggest a different approach to visual research, where the anthropologist does not abdicate his cultural and ‘political’ tasks to become a filmmaker, but is aware that he must ‘learn’ (and teach) how to see human reality. And my long wandering through visual anthropology allowed me to realize that one can be a good ‘visual’ anthropologist even if he does not make himself films or professional photographs – on the contrary I believe that the collaboration between the anthropologist and the photographer is often much more suitable. What we should do, is to interact and collaborate with professional filmmakers and/or photographers who share our own ideas about the ‘observation’ of humans: not a sort of voyeurism, but an emotional sharing of their memories, of their daily life, of their emotions, of their fears – and of course the awareness that anthropology has an intrinsic ‘political’ involvement. Here my aim is to explain my own approach through some examples of anthropological research based on a tight collaboration with photographers (Davide Virdis, acrhitect and photographer – Stefano Morelli, psychologist and photographer – Mario Chieffo, freelance photographer), and one specific work done involving also a filmmaker, Sandro Nardoni. Those works are actually steps of a route that led me to realize how dangerous the overemphasis of our sense of seeing may be.


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13128/SMP-19706



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